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007

The Wildwood Leader

Published, Wednesday, April 25, 2007

New Jersey, USA

Return to Shorenewstoday.com  l  Return to The Wildwood Leader

 

County Clerk begins mailing absentee ballots

CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE – The Cape May County Clerk’s Office has begun mailing absentee ballots for the May 8 municipal elections being held in Avalon, Sea Isle City and Wildwood. Printed ballots arrived from the printer on April 19. The initial mailing on April 19 included 133 absentee ballots for the three communities: nine for Avalon, 92 for Sea Isle City and 32 for Wildwood. Absentee ballot applications must be received in the County Clerk’s Office by May 1 to be processed by mail. After that date voters requesting an absentee ballot must apply in person at the County Clerk’s Office up to May 7 at 3 p.m., the day before Election Day. If the voter is sick or confirmed he/she may designate a messenger, on the Absentee Ballot Application. The messenger must be a family member or registered voter in Cape May County and may not be a candidate for the election in which the voter is applying for a ballot. Anyone assisting a voter in completing his/her absentee ballot application must provide name, address and signature on the application. The assistor may not be a candidate in the current election. The County Clerk’s Office is located at 7 N. Main Street in Cape May Court House. The Board of Elections is located at 10-12 W. Mechanic Street, also in Court House. Voted absentee ballots must be received at the Board of Elections by 8 p.m. on Election Day, May 8. Absentee ballot applications are available at the County Clerk’s Office, at the municipal clerk’s office or on the web at www.capemaycountygov.net. Click on Form Center, scroll down to County Clerk, Elections. For information call 465-1013. Return to Story Index

 

Register now for summer, fall courses at ACCC

CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE -- Registration is under way for Atlantic Cape Community College’s five summer sessions and the fall semester. Students can register at the college’s Cape May County Campus, 341 Court House-South Dennis Road, Cape May Court House. Extended registration from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. will be held May 21. Regular registration hours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. began April 20 and will continue weekdays through July 5 for summer and fall courses. Registration for the fall semester only continues through Aug. 31. The college will be closed May 28 and July 4, and on Fridays June 1 to Aug. 17. The first summer session is just six weeks, running May 21 to June 28. An eight-week session begins June 25 and continues through Aug. 16, and a second six-week session runs July 9 to Aug. 16. In addition, two accelerated 11-day sessions begin May 21 and June 11. Fall classes start Sept. 4. Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express are accepted. Students can register in person, by mail, fax and online with a PIN at www.atlantic.edu/web4students. For a complete listing of courses, visit ACCC’s www.atlantic.edu/web4students or call 463-4774, ext. 5000, for a free schedule. Return to Story Index



Friday is ‘Dress in Blue’ day

Azure, royal and indigo: across Cape May County citizens of all ages will be wearing blue for kids on April 27. Ever since the first proclamation in 1983, National Child Abuse Prevention Month has been celebrated with the wearing of blue ribbons to show active support of our children and families, and to take a stand against the heartache and tragedy of child abuse and neglect. Caring for Kids reports that over 3 million American children are reported abused and neglected each year, with 40,000 in the Garden State. This year in Virginia, we’ve also experienced the tragic aftermath of bullying, rejection and of rage turned outward. “With research premising child abuse and neglect as precursors to juvenile delinquency, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, mental health issues, school failure and to violence, the occurrence of abuse and neglect ends up being a heartache for all of us,” said Sandra McGarvey, executive director of the Caring For Kids Exchange Club Family Center. On “Dress in Blue” day, she asks each individual citizen to join in the center’s resolve to leave no child behind, provoked to anger or to hopelessness, to wear blue in advocacy of our children’s safety, health and happiness. For blue ribbons or parenting assistance, to volunteer or to donate, call 399-9110 or 465-0911. Return to Story Index



Great American Car Show at Kindle Auto Plaza

CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE -- Kindle Auto Plaza and the South Jersey Mustang Club will host a celebration of classic Ford cars at the second annual Great American Car Show on Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The show is open to all Ford vehicles and is expected to feature Mustangs from 1964 until the present, as well as Ford pick-up trucks and Lincolns. "There could be everything from a Model T to the present day," said Emil Hibian, president of the South Jersey Mustang Club. "You never know what's going to show up and that's part of the fun. People bring in some amazing cars." Participants in the show will vote on 30 People's Choice trophies. The South Jersey Mustang Club and Kindle Auto Plaza will each pick an award winner as well. Vehicles will be judged in five specialty categories: Best Engine, Best Interior, Best Paint, Best Ford, Best Mustang and Best of Show. The Great American Car Show is free and open to the public. There will be music and food available for purchase. The Great American Car Show takes place at Kindle Auto Plaza, 525 Stone Harbor Blvd., in Cape May Court House. Cars may be entered up until noon on the day of the show. All vehicles must have insurance. Pre-registration is $10. Registration on the day of the show is $15. For more information, email SouthJerseyMustangClub@comcast.net. Return to Story Index



 
Hurricane Hunter on display at county airport

ERMA -- The P3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft will be in Cape May County on Tuesday, May 1. The aircraft will be stopping at the Cape May County Airport in Lower Township on May 1 as part of its 2007 East Coast Hurricane Awareness Tour. Approximately 15 crew members will be conducting tours of the aircraft throughout the day to explain its various functions. Traveling with the tour this year will be Bill Proenza, newly appointed director of NOAA’s Tropical Prediction Center and National Hurricane Center, as well as Dean Gulezian, Director of the National Weather Service (NWS) Eastern Region. The Hurricane Hunter is scheduled to arrive at Cape May County Airport at 9:30 a.m., weather permitting. Student tours for fourth- and fifth-graders from southern New Jersey schools will begin at 10 a.m. and continue until 2 p.m. The general public can tour the aircraft from 3 to 5 p.m. The Aviation Museum is kind enough to provide hangar space for information booths that will be staffed with experts from the Red Cross, the U.S. Geological Service, and various other agencies tasked with providing support and safety functions whenever disaster strikes the region. For additional information, call Joe Miketta at 261-6602 ext. 223 or visit capemaycountygov.net Return to Story Index

 
Kaitlin Anzelone Memorial Foundation benefit May 5

WILDWOOD -- The third annual Kaitlin “Baby Oney” Anzelone Memorial Foundation beef and beer benefit will be held Saturday, May 5 from 6 to 10 p.m. at Michael’s Bar and Restaurant at Burke and New Jersey avenues in Wildwood. The fund provides assistance to hospitalized or bed-confined cancer patients and also goes toward scholarships presented to students at area high schools in Kaitlin’s memory. Cost is $20 per ticket. The event will include door prizes, 50-50 drawings, a silent auction and musical entertainment. Tickets can be purchased at Michael’s Bar and Restaurant or by calling 522-3805 or 523-0009. Return to Story Index

 

Kindle holding 50th anniversary Mustang giveaway

CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE -- To mark its 50th anniversary in business, Kindle Auto Plaza is giving away an American classic: a red 2007 Mustang V6 Coupe. "The Mustang has epitomized sports coupe style and muscle since it debuted back in 1964," said Bill Kindle, owner of Kindle Auto Plaza. "It's not only still going strong, it's getting better. We thought it was an ideal choice for our 50th anniversary giveaway because of its history and success, both of which mirror Kindle's." The Kindle Auto Plaza 50th anniversary Mustang giveaway features a Mustang V6 Coupe with an MSRP of $22,610. It has a five-speed auto transmission, a 4.0 L SOHC V6 engine, leather trimmed bucket seats and an interior upgrade package. The Mustang is painted torch red with a pearl gold stripe and rear deck lid spoiler. The 2007 model comes with a three-year/36,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty and a five-year, powertrain warranty. To qualify to win the Mustang, contestants must follow a series of clues to identify landmarks in Cape May County. Clues are posted on Kindle Auto Plaza's website at www.kindleautoplaza.com and announced in select print and radio ads. Entries must be dropped off at Kindle Auto Plaza in Cape May Court House. Each month during the contest, beginning May 1 and ending Sept. 30, Kindle Auto Plaza will randomly select a semifinalist each month for five months, who submitted a correct answer. Five semifinalists will compete in November for the chance to drive away in a brand new Mustang. The remaining four will receive an auto detail and a year's free scheduled maintenance on their vehicles. The contest officially begins on April 25. Semifinalist winners will be drawn on June 1, July 1, Aug. 1, Sept. 1 and Oct. 1. A complete set of contest rules is posted on Kindle Auto Plaza's website. Located off of exit 10 on the Garden State Parkway, Kindle Auto Plaza sells vehicles manufactured by Ford, Dodge, Lincoln-Mercury, Isuzu and Suzuki. For more information, visit www.kindleautoplaza.com or call 465-5000. Return to Story Index

 

Wildwood Catholic announces third quarter honor roll

NORTH WILDWOOD -- Wildwood Catholic High School is pleased to announce the names of those students who have achieved academic honors for the third marking period of the 2006-2007 school year. First honors are accorded to students who carry six major subjects with a general average of 4.0 or above with no grade lower than B in any subject. Second honors are given to those carrying six major subjects with a general average of 3.5 or above with no grade lower than B in any subject. Return to Story Index

First honors were achieved by:

Seniors

John Accardi
Gabriel Arnold
Luke Bischoff
Delia Cannon
Natalie Cooper
Victoria D’Amico
Raymond Fox
Samantha Garcia
Kathryn Golas
Alexandra Herforth
Victoria Lederer
John Maloy
Sarah Mathis
Kelly McVeigh
Molly Moran
Brian Namiotka
Heather Nanos
Sherilyn Neri
Kristen Panny
Patrick Prin
Paul Russo
Rachel Scott
Patrick Smith
Raymond Strawley
Michael Tompkins
Robert Waterman

Juniors

Rebecca Angelastro
Elizabeth Carbone
Laura Deshusses
Jessica Donahue
Sean Frankel
Rachel Lyons
Robert Matteucci
Patrick McGuigan
Sally O’Donnell
Zach Ostrowsky
Glyka Papaspanos
Deven Parker
Anthony Poukish
Adam Roszkowski
Allison Sickerott
Katherine Spagnolo
Alexis Sullivan
Cathleen Towler
Morgan Visalli
Catherine Winans

Sophomores

Kelly Bradley
Katherine Calemmo
Katrina Dever
Jessica Frankel
Marianne Harlan
Keira Heilpern
Thomas Kasper
Mary Marino
Amber Slawek
Joseph Stevenson
Sara Tumasz-Zolty
Madeleine Von Savage
Jessica Wheaton

Freshmen

Victoria Bennett
Christine Casiello
Emily Dagney
Lindsay Galle
Catherine Matteucci
Kaitlin Moran
Cristina Mucchetti
Amanda Palombo
Joseph Poukish
Kyle Raucci
Ashley Russo
Sean Santiago
Sarah Smith
Alexa Stefankiewicz
Cassidy Stoughton
Frances Winans
Return to Story Index

Second honors were achieved by:

Seniors

Sarah Beyel
Sean Conyers
Robert Dougherty
Kevin Ewing
Elizabeth Gallagher
John Gallagher
Christopher Garriott
Kellianne Gawarzewski
William Jett
Blair Koehler
Matthew Krobatsch
Tiffany McKenna
Kenna Moore
Alexanfer Perka
Samantha Piro
Abigail Revoir
Shane Seabrook
Caitlin Sweeney

Juniors

Megan Birchall
Destinee Caffarella
Edwin Fath
Mark Malec
Christi Mallia
Olivia McMahon
Alexander Palatajko
Brittany Toland

Sophomores

Samuel Accardi
Christina Albert
Tyler Clark
Elaina Davidson
Patricia Dougherty
Samantha Gery
Elizabeth Herron
Travis LaBounty
Christina Ohlsen
Catherine Powers
Emily Sheeran
Patrick Slavin
Allison Weiser

Freshmen

Sarah Cannon
Kenneth Haury
Anna Kane
Timothy Kaye
Angela Mathis
James Mathis
Maureen Meckley
Patrick Namiotka
McKenzey Scott
Danielle Sharkey
Return to Story Index

 
The Wildwoods salute the Sixties

WILDWOOD -- The second annual "Sensational Sixties" will be a musical celebration of the 1960s. Events at the Wildwoods Convention Center: a Friday evening Record Hop with Jerry Blavat; a free Street Fair all day Saturday with live music, contests, classic cars and vendors; and a Saturday evening concert featuring Tommy James & the Shondells, the Turtles, the Lovin' Spoonful, and the Soul Survivors. Friday, April 27 the Wildwoods Convention Center will hold the Sensational Sixties Record Hop starting at 7 p.m. hosted by popular '50s disc jockey Jerry "The Geator" Blavat. This evening of classic dance, music, food, cocktails and more kicks off the weekend and will be broadcast live on 94.3 FM WILW. Admission is only $10 per person and promises to kick off this “sensational” weekend with a bang. Saturday, the Street Fair kicks off at 11 a.m. hosted by ‘Philly’s Phavorite DJ, Lou Costello, and Wildwood’s own Rick Rock. This street fair features live music, classic cars displayed on the Boardwalk, food and merchandise vendors, contests and much more. Street Fair entertainment includes musical performances by Beatlemania Again and Love Affair. And don’t forget to pack your dancing shoes for the record-setting ‘60’s Soul Line Dancing attempt with Mike Rowe on the boardwalk. If a little relaxation is what you’re looking for, take a ride on the Doo Wop Back to the ‘50s Tour. Taking a trip through the Wildwoods will take you back to the ’50s with architecture that juts, slopes, curves and slices. Tickets for adults are $8 and $4 for children. When you’re tour is complete don’t miss the grand opening of the Doo Wop Museum, which is located across the street from the Convention Center. The main event on Saturday starts at 7 p.m. at the Wildwoods Convention Center’s Oceanfront Arena, the Sensational Sixties Concert. Featuring big names such as Tommy James and the Shondells, whose hits include “Mony, Mony,” “I Think We’re Alone Now” and “Crimson and Clover;” The Turtles “Happy Together” and “Elenore;” Lovin’ Spoonful, “Do You Believe in Magic,” “You Didn’t Have to be so Nice” and “Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind;” and The Soul Survivors, who are the singers of “Expressway (To Your Heart),” “Do You Feel It?” and “Poor Man’s Dream.” Tickets to this blast from the past are $40 per person and can be purchased at www.fabfifties.com or by calling the Greater Wildwoods Chamber of Commerce toll free at 1-888-729-0033. This event filled weekend will come to an end on Sunday with a free concert at Second and Olde New Jersey avenues in North Wildwood. Starting at noon, the concert will showcase acts such as 1910 Fruit Gum Company, The Archie’s Ron Dante and The Association’s Jim Yester. The Super ’60s Sunday, hosted by Paul Russo, will be the perfect ending to an exciting weekend in the Wildwoods. Return to Story Index

 
World Series of Birding, noncompetitive birding is May 12

CAPE MAY -- If you love birding but are not quite ready for the big leagues of the New Jersey Audubon Society’s World Series of Birding, then the Nature Center of Cape May’s noncompetitive birding team may be for you. Saturday, May 12 is the 24th annual World Series of Birding. The Nature Center’s team will celebrate with a leisurely morning of birding beginning at the center’s environmental education campus on the shores of Cape May Harbor at 8:30 a.m. The team will visit birding hot spots around Cape Island. There is no admission fee, however, team members are asked to collect pledges of at least $1 per species on the WSB’s official pledge form. All proceeds will benefit the Nature Center of Cape May. NCCM team members may bring their own binoculars or borrow a pair from the center. The registration deadline is May 1. A maximum of 10 team members will be accepted. Call the Nature Center at 898-8848 for more information. The Nature Center of Cape May is located at 1600 Delaware Ave., in Cape May. Return to Story Index

 
Pet Week

Rosie, Flutterbee will make your heart shudder

CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE -- Rosie, a female pit bull and terrier mix, and Flutterbee, a female tiger cat, are our pets of the week at the Cape May County Animal Shelter and Adoption Center. Rosie is part of the “Open your heart” program here at the shelter. This poor little girl is very depressed here. She is very sweet, even with strangers and other animals, and has tons of energy. Rosie weighs about 48 pounds, loves to play outside and is a little rambunctious. But Rosie was surrendered by her previous owners because they did not know how to take care of her. She has been spayed, is up to date with all of her vaccination and is house trained. Rosie would make a wonderful addition to a family who has the time and patience to commit to her. Her adoption fee is only $10—at that price, it would be foolish not to just give her a look. Little Flutterbee in 2 to 4 years old, weighs about 7 pounds and laid back like no other. This poor baby’s owner passed away, and so she was shipped off to the shelter. Flutterbee is a sweetie who needs a little time, patience and a loving hand to bring her out of her shell and make her feel at home again. Flutterbee is one kitty who gets along well with other animals (dogs and cats), and loves people. Her adoption fee is $20. Come visit Rosie and Flutterbee or any of their other adoptable pals at the county facility, located at the north end of Moore Road past the Crest Haven Complex. Call 465-8923 or visit Petfinder.com for more information. Adoption hours are noon to 3 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays; 1 to 5 p.m. on Thursdays; 2 to 4 p.m. on Fridays; and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. The shelter is closed on holidays. Return to Story Index

Katie is a gem

DIAS CREEK -– Meet Katie. This female Welsh corgi and Australian shepherd mix is our pet of the week at Bayshore Kennels. Katie is called a gem by our friends at the shelter because of her beautiful looks, easy going personality and loving demeanor. Katie would make a great family pet or a companion for just about anyone. She is up to date with all of her routine vaccinations, has been has trained and is spayed. She is only about a year old and weighs 40 to 50 pounds. Please don’t pass Katie up, she could be the girl you’ve been looking for to make your family complete. The Bayshore facility sets adoption fees based on the age and condition of a dog. Dogs are $100 and puppies are $125. Please visit Katie or any of her friends here at the shelter and give them a warm home to spend their lives in, or call 465-3121 for additional information. The facility can also be found at Petfinders.com. As always, Bayshore appreciates donations of dog and cat food, sheets and blankets, animal toys and cleaning products. Return to Story Index

Sedona is mature and mellow

DIAS CREEK – Sedona, a beautiful white, long-haired female cat, is temporarily residing at the Animal Welfare Society located on Route 47 South. Sedona is approximately 8 to 9 years old, and quite peaceful and mellow in her ways. Sedona is very mature and enjoys spending her time lying in a window in the warm sun or watching the birds go by. Being caressed while curled up in her owner’s lap is also one of Sedona’s favorite pastimes. This lovely lady would make a great companion for just about anyone looking for a loving pet. Sedona is up to date with all of her routine vaccinations and has been spayed. Please come and meet Sedona or any other of her adoptable pals at the Animal Welfare Society (AWS) 40 Route 47 South in Dias Creek. Our hours of adoption are Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Please call 465-3403 for additional information or directions to the shelter.  Return to Story Index

 
Crest Memorial School adopts new vision statement

WILDWOOD CREST -- The Wildwood Crest Board of Education, at its March meeting, adopted a new vision statement – a document that was created by a committee of school and community members interested in continuing the level of excellence achieved by Crest Memorial School. The vision statement document, designed as an acrostic of the word “learning,” was written by a committee of nine people who met several times to give their ideas and suggestions. The committee included teachers Cindy Bada and Sherri Carranante; principal’s secretary Mary O’Donnell and Principal Ann Maria Guevara; parents Pam Gentek and Tina Hawthorne; school board members Jim Bradley and Judy Huber; and Wildwood Crest Chief of Police Tom DePaul. Prior to this newest edition of the vision statement, the existing one had not been updated since 2003. “It was time for revision,” explained Guevara. “These documents need to be updated regularly to reflect the needs of the community and the community interests,” she said. The committee’s 187-word vision statement has been typeset and a framed copy hangs at the main entrance to the school to remind parents, educators and students what the community’s educational goals are. “This is really a statement of what the school and community believes to be the most important things in education. Moreover, it states what the educational institution will do. It’s not just theory, it’s a plan for action,” said Guevara. The vision statement is as follows: - Lifelong Learning: We will instill in our students a lifelong love of learning, and model this through our own continuous professional development and growth. - Equality/Expectations: We believe that all students can learn and we will hold high expectations for all students. - Academic Excellence: Our educational program, revised regularly to ensure its rigor and relevance, will enable students to think critically, function independently, and meet confidently the challenges which await them. - Reflection: We will reflect regularly on the quality and efficacy of our educational program, changing it as necessary to meet the changing needs of our students and our community. - Needs: We will recognize and respond to the needs of the whole child, including his/her physical, psychological and emotional needs. - Innovation: We will actively seek and incorporate innovative instructional methods and technology into our educational program. - Nurture: We will nurture in our students a respect for individuality and an appreciation for the rich diversity of our world. - Guidance: Through an emphasis on academic excellence, as well as support for the well being of the whole child, we will guide students to become confident, productive citizens of the world.” The vision statement is displayed prominently at five locations throughout the school. Return to Story Index

Jeannine Yecco

 
Crest Memorial holds fundraiser at Bayview

WILDWOOD CREST -- Crest Memorial recently held its first Spring Beef and Beverage Fundraiser at the Bayview Inn. This family friendly, fun night was organized by the Crest Memorial PTC Board. It event was filled with lots of fun things to do for the whole family. There was a DJ taking requests, dancing, Quizzo, door prizes, raffles and a visit from the Easter Bunny. This successful fundraiser was heavily attended and well received by supporters of Crest Memorial. The monies raised at this event, along with other PTC-sponsored events, goes to special projects and events at school for Crest Memorial students. Return to Story Index

 
Glenwood Student Council hosts flea market Saturday

WILDWOOD – Glenwood Avenue School students, including those pictured Taalibah McCoy, Joseph Ricciardi, Dinae De Mayo and Edwin Mercada, will be hard at work this week, preparing for the Student Council’s annual flea market, scheduled from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 28 in the school cafeteria. Donations of “trash to treasure” items from teachers and families have been pouring into the school for weeks, and this week students and teachers will volunteer their time to get the merchandise ready for sale. A large inventory of quality household items will be for sale, including artwork, a TV, a microwave, plant stands, suitcases, holiday decorations, furniture and clothing. The student council will split the proceeds between a charity of their choice and the school’s library. Entry to the event is through the Glenwood Avenue courtyard, just west of New York Avenue. Return to Story Index

 
News Notes

Wal-Mart manager says store will be open June 13

RIO GRANDE -- There are no more tentative dates or extensions for perhaps the most anticipated store opening in the township. According to officials the grand opening of the Wal-Mart store on Route 9 at the Grande Village Shopping Center has been slated for June 13. A July date announced earlier this month had been incorrectly announced by Middle Township Mayor Nate Doughty, and the store will tentatively open much sooner. Wal-Mart manager D.C. Lopez said “there are no ifs, ands or buts, the store will be open on June 13.” Wal-Mart management and new hires will officially enter the store on May 7, Lopez said, to stock and set up for opening day. “I’ve been waiting for this store to open since last year,” Lopez said from the Wal-Mart hiring center in the Rio Grande Village Center on Tuesday, “and trust me, the store is opening.” Lopez could barely catch his breath as he interviewed one applicant after the other in the confined, but crowed space. Some employees who had already been hired were watching training videos and being given instruction on store policy, while other potential candidates were filling out applications before being interviewed by Lopez and his staff. Wal-Mart is looking to hire about 320 employees, according to Bertha Carlo, a former personnel employee and soon-to-be Rio Grande store employee. “If all goes well we’re looking to hire 320 people if not a little more,” Carlo said, “but it’s difficult because we not only have to go through the application process, but we have to do all of the background checks, check references and all of the other personnel matters.” Wal-Mart employees said more than 500 people have applied for jobs thus far, and they keep coming. “It ranges from people of all age groups and backgrounds,” Carlo said. “For some it’s their first job, some are seasonal and others are retirees or senior citizens looking for part-time work.” It will take approximately 90 days to stock the store, officials said, but it looks like employees will have to finish sooner to meet the June 13 deadline. The developer, township officials and residents have been hard pressed to see the commencement of 142,229-square-foot store retail giant since its construction was completed last spring. The new store will not be considered a Super Wal-Mart, Wal-Mart representatives said earlier this year, but it will be equipped with a pharmacy, one-hour photo center and snack bar, as well as its general merchandise. A tire and oil exchange will also be located within the building, and the parking lot has the capacity to park about 728 cars for the stores, and around 113 for the retail mall. Currently, operating hours are slated to be 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Return to Story Index

Doo Wop Museum ribbon cutting and dedication

WILDWOOD -- A new cultural and recreational attraction for the city of Wildwood is scheduled to have its ribbon cutting Saturday, April 28 at 1 p.m., as part of the Sensational Sixties Celebration with support from local, county and state dignitaries, the owners of Doo Wop style motels and the members of the Doo Wop Preservation League. The museum will be located directly across the street from the Wildwoods Convention Center on Ocean Avenue and will be housed in the newly restored 1960’s-era Surfside Restaurant. This pinwheel shaped building was rebuilt using the original steel framework and other artifacts that were stored when the building was taken down from its original site in 2002. Once open to the public, the museum will include an outdoor band shell used for concerts as well as a wide range of entertaining. Additional features of the building will be comprised of a neon sign garden including signs salvaged from demolished building in the Wildwoods and exhibits celebrating the Doo Wop heritage and history of the Wildwoods motels and tourism industry. The new addition to the face of the Wildwoods is bound to become a major landmark for tourists and locals alike for generations to come. Additionally, the Doo Wop Preservation will be running Back to the ’50s Tours on Saturday, at 11 a.m., noon and 3 p.m. The tours will begin at the drop off circle of the Wildwoods Convention Center and will cost $12 for adults, $6 for children. Return to Story Index

Middle man attempts to lure N. Wildwood children into his car

NORTH WILDWOOD -- On April 9, John “JJ” Yeager of Del Haven, was arrested in North Wildwood for attempting to lure a child into his motor vehicle. Yeager, who was driving a 2002 silver Dodge Dakota, pulled up to three juveniles playing outside their residence. When Yeager asked the juveniles to come to his vehicle, the juveniles ran into their residence and advised their guardians who notified police. Yeager was arrested a few blocks away by local police. Yeager was charged and lodged in the Cape May County Correctional Facility on $50,000 cash bail. Return to Story Index

2,567 incidents in March in North Wildwood

NORTH WILDWOOD – City police handled 2,567 calls for the period from March 1 to March 31. Police answered six motor vehicle accidents, four thefts, five burglaries, three fraud cases, two simple assaults, one aggravated assault and two drug offenses. Other incidents included: 120 disorderly persons offenses, 13 malicious property damage calls, 431 traffic enforcement, 160 summonses issued, 62 medical incidents, three recovered stolen items, 15 animal complaints and 32 false burglar alarms. Fifty-three persons were arrested which included 50 adults and there were three drunk driving arrests. Police conducted 1,263 residential and business property checks and assisted the fire department at six fires. There were six false fire alarms in March. Additional calls covered 22 other agency assists. There were 555 miscellaneous services. Forty-three beach and boardwalk permits were processed and $5,205.75 in fee collections was forwarded to the city clerk. Department personnel attended six schools during March. Return to Story Index

Accountant pleads guilty to stealing from Crest condo association

CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE – Francis M. Daulerio, 57, of 6 Cedar Trail, Medford, a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), pleaded guilty in Cape May County Superior Court on April 12 to one count of theft by deception, a second degree crime, involving the theft of over $75,000 from one of his clients. As a result of an approximately 10-month joint investigation among the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office, the Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office, the Wildwood Crest Police Department and the Medford Township Police Department, the defendant entered a guilty plea to a single count of theft by deception. It is alleged that Daulerio, while acting as a CPA, committed the theft of approximately $338,000 from a condominium association located in Wildwood Crest over a one-year period. Daulerio was the accountant for the association for approximately 10 years. The plea agreement reached calls for the defendant to be sentenced to three years in New Jersey State Prison and restitution to be determined by the court. Daulerio will be sentenced in Cape May County Superior Court on June 15. Return to Story Index

 
Chamber’s new director is off and running
By MAUREEN L. CAWLEY Corresspondent

WILDWOOD – Tracy Boyle-DeFault has had to hit the ground running. During her first week as the new director of the Greater Wildwoods Chamber of Commerce, she attended her first chamber luncheon – meeting dozens of members and greeting three of the island’s mayors. And more - the Sensational Sixties weekend -- is this weekend, and summer is looming. It’s a lot to take in, she admits, but she takes it in stride. “It’s going be fabulous,” she said. Boyle-DeFault hails from Andorra, originally, as is the case for so many Philadelphians, Wildwood is her second home – and one that has a special place in her heart. Her parents owned the former Sand Dollar Motel in North Wildwood, and she spent many summers on Wildwoods’ beaches and in local businesses. It was here that she met her husband, John, of Middle Township, and the couple had their first date at the Dragon House, on Pacific Avenue. The couple and their two small children currently live in Atlantic County, near the Atlantic City casinos, where Boyle-DeFault worked in marketing for more than a decade. But she has always wanted to move closer to her family in Wildwood. Now she has an excuse. “Ultimately, we want to be moving closer, she said. Boyle-DeFault says that her lifetime of experience in Wildwood gives her a more clear perspective on how business works here. “What is so different about Wildwood more than any other place that I worked is that 90 percent of the businesses in Wildwood are family-owned and operated” she said. “Their businesses are personal to them.” She says she remembers the hours her parents put into running their motel, and she believes that many local business owners work equally hard – often in the hopes of building a legacy for their children. “It’s wonderful to work with people who take it so personally,” she said. And she adds, that the executive board and staff of the chamber are equally passionate about the work the organization does to support those businesses. The chamber has seen some major changes over the past two years – first with the resignation in 2005 of long-time chamber director Andy Cripps, and again when his replacement Brian Barry left last fall. Boyle-DeFault attributes the chamber’s effectiveness during those months to the commitment of the board -- especially board President Lori Roach and former President Linda Williams -- and the dedication of the staff. “The staff was doing a wonderful job,” she said. Boyle-DeFault said she was also impressed with the enthusiasm of the island mayors, who spoke about future development projects in the Wildwoods. “There are some great ideas. It just amazes me - the foresight,” she said, Boyle-DeFault said she does not know the local officials yet, but she hopes to build relationships with them. “The only way to grow is to completely think outside the box,” she said. Boyle-DeFault said she looks forward to meeting with the board to determine long-term goals for the organization, and she speculated that she might focus on building membership. The organization is “holding steady” at about 650 members, she said. But for now, there’s other work to do. The chamber’s boardwalk tourism office will soon re-open, and it will continue to provide visitors with necessary information on hotel vacancies, restaurants and other local businesses, all summer long, she said. And the plans for the chamber’s annual Restaurant Showcase on May 16 are moving forward. “I’m looking forward to having a role in the planning,” she said. Return to Story Index

Maureen L. Cawley can be e-mailed at maureen.cawley@catamaranmedia.com or you can comment on this story by calling 624-8900, ext. 250, or visiting www.shorenewstoday.com and clicking on the Speak Out link.

 
Osborn chairs GOP campaign in Wildwoods

THE WILDWOODS -- Bill Osborn Jr., all-star South Jersey athlete and TV sports analyst, will chair the Wildwoods leg of the campaign of 1st District Republican Sen. Nick Asselta and his Assembly running mates, R. Norris Clark and Michael Donohue. “As a New Jersey native, I know that the team of Asselta-Clark-Donohue definitely has the drive to tackle the problems in Trenton for the residents of the 1st District,” Osborn says. “With their combined experiences and expertise, Asselta, Clark and Donohue will battle the issues that have led to New Jersey’s sky-high property taxes and multi-billion dollar budget deficit.” Osborn grew up on Five Mile Beach, where his name still is synonymous with excellence. A stand-out three-sport athlete at Wildwood High School, he was named South Jersey High School Athlete of the Decade in the 1980s. He went on to play three sports at the University of Pittsburgh. He became the first and only athlete there since Mike Ditka to letter in three sports. “Bill Osborn will bring the same determination and drive to the Asselta-Clark-Donohue campaign that he brought to the playing field,” says David I. Von Savage, chairman of the Cape May County Regular Republican Organization. “No matter what sport–whether he was going to the hoop in the final seconds of the basketball game or breaking a tackle to make a touchdown--Bill Osborn gave it his all. That’s the kind of fighting spirit we’ll need to get Republican Sen. Nick Asselta re-elected and to send Norris Clark and Michael Donohue to the Assembly. We need energy like theirs to clean up the mess Democrats have made in Trenton.” Return to Story Index

 

Vintage postcard exhibit enjoys biggest show yet
By JACOB SCHAAD JR. Correspondent

WILDWOOD -- The next time you mail a picture postcard while on vacation it may mean more than a friendly gesture. You could be contributing to nostalgia in 50 years or so. That point was demonstrated Saturday at the third annual and biggest postcard exhibit of the Wildwood Historical Society on tented grounds adjacent to the George F. Boyer Museum.at 3907 Pacific Ave. Ten exhibitors were there to sell, trade and show many thousands of postcards dating back to 1896. While most of the cards had not gone through the mailing process some had and they revealed interesting backgrounds about the senders and the pictures on the cards. Such as the card postmarked Aug. 15, 1913, that showed the lawn of the Edgeton Inn at Pacific and Cedar avenues. Built in the 1890s it was said to be one of the first hotels on Five Mile Beach to include electricity and call bells. It later was destroyed in a fire. The card was addressed to Ethel Booth, of Chester, Pa., by a woman who identified herself only as “Sara.” The message read: “Dear Ethel: I am glad the boy was good last night. The place here is fine. Sara.” One of the veteran exhibitors was Cape May’s Don Pocher who has been exhibiting for more than 25 years. He has 20,000 cards in his collection and he showed about 15,000 of them at the Wildwood exhibit, the oldest dating back to 1901, which he said was the golden age of postcards. The first printing of postcards began in 1893, he said, and they became popular with the public in 1901. Pocher formerly exhibited at 26 shows a year, but now is down to15, he said. Most of the postcards exhibited at shows have been acquired through purchase or trades. Among the other exhibitors Saturday was former Cape May Mayor Bob Elwell, whose collection of books, postcards and other historic memorabilia covers the Wildwoods, Cape May and other areas of New Jersey. He says he exhibits for the fun of it. “I meet a lot of my old buddies here,” said Elwell, a one-time captain of detectives in the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office. Among his exhibits was the reproduction of a book, “History of Methodism in Cape May,” written by the Rev. A. Atwood in 1867. Originally 500 copies were printed and Elwell has 10 left, each selling for $6. Another book displayed for sale was “The Wildwoods in Vintage Postcards,” covering a period from 1900 to 1925. Published in 2002, it was assembled by James D. Ristine, of East Berlin, Pa., with a special prologue by Robert J. Scully Sr., curator of the Wildwood Historic Society and co-author of the books “Wildwood by the Sea” and North Wildwood’s 100th anniversary book, “North Wildwood Then and Now.” The book of postcards sells for $19.99 and is available for purchase at the museum. Scully said that in three years the exhibit has grown from three exhibitors to 10. No charge is assessed for exhibit space although donations are accepted for the museum. The museum, which last year attracted between 5,000 and 6,000 visitors, according to Al Brannen, a board member, is hoping to expand to adjacent property. The museum, founded in 1963, once was hidden on the second floor of the City Hall, but moved to its current more visible site in 1990 and has become a popular attraction in Wildwood. It is managed by the Wildwood Historical Society. Return to Story Index

Jake Schaad can be e-mailed at gazette@catamaranmedia.com or you can comment on this story by calling 624-8900, ext. 250, or visiting www.shorenewstoday.com and clicking on the Speak Out link.

 
WHS announces third period honor roll

1st Honor Roll

9th Grade

Lauren Irwin

10th Grade

Rebecca Sandora

11th Grade

Kyle Morey

12th Grade

Theresa Allen Robinson
Katherine Cosimi
Desire Elam
Return to Story Index

2nd Honor Roll

12th Grade

Edwin Arocho
Roxanne Biggs
Whitney Dozier Pinkett
Shamika Gibbs
Mariam Gonzalez
Daneen Green
Ryan Hall Hope
Howard Gregory Larcombe
Brenda Matos
Kelly McCaughey
Nathali Perez Cruz
Dia Swan
Victoria Viviani

11th Grade

Rochelle Colella
Kia Connolly
Melody De Piso
Michael Di Biasio
Isaac Jamison
Allison Kolodi
Christina Lazaro
Eric Sanguinetti
Jenny Tillotson
Maxim Timofeev

10th Grade

Marisa Brannau
Shaun Brown
Kevin Fetsick
Edward Pelaez
Marcus Wright
Lindsey Tillotson

9th Grade

Shannon Alvarez
Briana Brown
Danielle Ferrante
Lia Ferrante
Marissa Ferrante
Loretta Kelly
Juliet King Katelynn
Kuni Nina Martinez
John Matteo
Kaitlyn McWade
Rachael Sandora
Cheryl Solano
Kacy Wilber
Emily Tillotson
Steven White
Cheryl Solano
Return to Story Index

 
Wildwood candidates: What is their vision for the future?
By MAUREEN L. CAWLEY Correspondent

WILDWOOD -- (Editor’s note: Correspondent Maureen Cawley has spent the past three weeks conducting interviews with the eight Wildwood City Commission candidates in the May 8 election. They are being published in alphabetical order.)

Kathy Breuss Ballot Position 4

Breuss is 56 years old and was born in Wildwood. She has lived here with her family since 1975. She holds an associate’s degree in finance and accounting and has completed the Certified Public Management 1 course through the state Department of Personnel. She has also completed coursework on municipal government the duties of municipal clerk, finance administration, the powers and duties of the municipal governing body, and municipal land use law. She is married to local plumbing contractor Joseph Breuss Sr. The couple has three children and two grandchildren, all of whom reside in Cape May County. She has worked in office management at Cape Assist and the County of Cape May, she has also worked in the City Clerk’s Office and the Tax and Water Departments from 1982-1987. She is the book keeper for her family’s plumbing business. Breuss has been Wildwood’s commissioner of revenue and finance since 2003.

Why are you running for office? What will you do if re-elected?

“I am excited. I think we have a very balanced team. Bill Davenport is very detail-oriented…since he came on board I am 100 percent on board…I have a very strong person in here who is going to change some of the things that need to be changed in this municipality (to make it better).”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“I think the most important issue facing Wildwood is the decrease in taxes. That is my goal as the commissioner of revenue and finance is to decrease the levy of taxes and to have more ratables to build up.”

What is your position on:

Taxes? In the past, the city has operated without a surplus, Breuss said, and it balanced the budget by selling city land or raising taxes.

“We are getting away from needing to do that…Four years ago, (when Breuss took office) I was hit with ‘we are in a $3.5 million hole.’ I could have thrown up,” but Breuss said she dug in and worked with what was available. “In the past we have used, added and omitted, and the assessments (to balance the budget), but they are not available until October.” This year, commissioners are expected to introduce the budget on Wednesday. They are able to do that in part because of the $2.9 million surplus from last year, Breuss said. The budget is usually balanced though a combination of taxes, grants and surplus, she said. “This is part of the money that is needed to offset your budget costs every year.” Breuss said she will work to continue to maintain that surplus so that land sales are no longer necessary.

Development/High Rises?

“I wasn’t sold on the ‘world-class hotels’ in the beginning, but now I know what it means to the ratable base and the effect it will have on taxes.”

Government services?

“I think we have a great police department and fire department. We have an incredible sanitation and public works department.” Breuss said she is aware that some taxpayers are calling for a reduction in services to lower the tax levy. “I just don’t see it – not with the growth the city is seeing.” She believes citizens would miss the services if they were cut.

Schools?

“I am certainly for the schools. I was disappointed to see they had a 5.5-cent increase last year because it made us look bad. (This year the levy is much lower.) I think it’s a solid school district regardless of what some people believe. You have to see the community that is there with the kids.”

In summary...

”I am going to continue on the path. Since 2005, our goal has been to build that surplus.” Return to Story Index

Bill Davenport Ballot Position 5

A lifelong Wildwood resident, born 1946. “I actually live 300 feet from the house I (grew up) in,” Davenport said. He graduated from Wildwood High School in 1964, earned an associates degree in business administration from Pierce Junior College in 1970, and ASS in fire control technology from Atlantic County Community College 1984, and a BS in applied science and technology from Thomas A. Edison State College in 1998. He is married to Linda M. (Tabone) Davenport. Their daughter Jennifer is an attorney. He’s a retired Wildwood Fire Department captain. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1964 to 1968 as a sergeant, including service in Vietnam in 1967. Currently does contract work for insurance companies to assess liability and fire safety in local properties. Owned and operated beach stands, an apartment house and the Fantasy Motel in the 1970s and ’80s. He served on the school board for 18 years; on the planning board since 1993 (vice-chairman), and is currently the city commissioner of public safety, replacing Commissioner Fred Wager when he passed away last year. Davenport describes his short time in office as “very enjoyable.”

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected? Davenport believes his years of service in the fire department, school board and planning board make the job a natural progression for him, since he knows his way around city hall and can get things done effectively.

“I accidentally prepared myself for (the job of public safety commissioner) very well.”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“(I believe it is ) the growth of the town, the direction of the town, changing it from a summer resort to a full-time tourist community, so that our kids don’t have to go off and find jobs in other areas. (The thing to focus on is) the direction of the city for a year-round vibrant area. The town is getting in better shape.”

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“Obviously budgets are important. We are crunching the numbers right now. It comes down to short-term and long-term planning. We’ve got to know what’s happening - next week, next month, next year. ... A reduction (in taxes) comes from a good economic base. When businesses do good, the town will benefit.”

Development/High Rises?

“I am pro ‘world-class hotels.’ Davenport said his experience as a motel owner taught him that it is increasingly difficult to make a living with a ‘mom and pop’ motel because of rising expenses. Many motel owners have chosen to sell their property for development, and in recent years many rooms have been lost. “One way to replace room economically and efficiently is (high rises). We’re competing with Florida and the Bahamas. We need to be competitive in Wildwood. (In addition), it means more jobs; more benefits for everyone…Every hotel could be up to a 10 percent increase in ratables. Davenport also commented on what he called the “cookie cutter condo situation.” He says that the city was responsive. “When they saw it happening, they did react to it as completely and quickly as possible (by making adjustments to the city’s zoning law), but it is an economic thing, you can’t tell people what to do with their property.” Overall however, he says most of the new properties are in “great condition, and are being occupied and rented and used as summer homes.”

Government services?

“Whatever else people want, they want to feel safe…we will continue to keep working on that, to make (services) more responsive to the community as it changes.”

Schools?

“I’m obviously pro-school. My daughter has a great career based on the education she got (in the Wildwood school system). Small schools do attend to student needs.”

Tourism?

“I think it’s the lifeblood of the island.” Davenport believes the key to building tourism is to extend the season. “We’ve got to support that in any way possible.” He believes the island needs more tourism amenities, such as rainy day activities, but admits that is not the job of government. “We’ve got to make it attractive, make the climate, and hopefully the investors will do the rest.”

In summary, Davenport says he believes the current administration is responsive to taxpayers and transparent.

“From our point of view, we are building on success. We are trying to make it a safe, clean community so developers can succeed here. We are working toward year-round business. We are hoping to have more residential districts away from the business districts. It will just take the right conditions that people will want to move here…will want to continue to make it a safe, clean community.” Return to Story Index

Gary S. DeMarzo Ballot Position 6

He is 40 years old, born in Brooklyn, N.Y. Graduated from Glassboro State University with a semester of international education in England. Completed New Jersey Police Academy. Plans to go to law school. Has lived in Wildwood since 1990. He is married to Brandy (Winsett), daughter of a fellow Wildwood police officer, and a Wildwood Catholic graduate. He has been a Wildwood police officer since 1990, he is also a licensed helicopter pilot, substitute teacher and Realtor. He served two terms on the school board. DeMarzo says his position as a police officer has helped him to learn about the inter-workings of City Hall, and it is his drive to help people that led him to police work and to seek a position as a commissioner. He is a first-time candidate.

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected?

“I think everyone runs to make a change – that’s my reason. We have to change the things that we are doing…We have to be open to everybody – residents, voters, tourists, (taxpayers). If we lose that connection to the community we lose that support.”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“It’s our tax base. It’s the stagnation of these major projects. It’s this ‘waiting for our ship to come in’ attitude. It leaves properties fenced in and underdeveloped…investors wondering what can be built. It just hold progress at (a standstill)…That directly relates to our taxes and jobs and the economic stability of this community.

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“They are outrageous. Tax relief starts at home at a local level. The incumbents’ tax plan (for next year) relies on state relief…What have they done to reduce taxes?” DeMarzo says the answer is “zero-based budgeting,” where a full analysis of the budget is done by looking at every line item every couple years to see where expenses can be cut. “This has never been done in the city of Wildwood.”

Development/High Rises?

“Everybody wants development, (but) the master plan is a mess. It was hidden from the public. It favors special interests…I am for big development. It benefits everybody…(but we can’t) have these behemoth buildings on properties that don’t support them.” DeMarzo said there was a lack of foresight, and that commissioners should have addressed issues with the state and given the public input before making changes to the master plan.

Government services?

“I understand that the public is smart enough to understand that the reduction in crime is directly related to a reduction in population.” DeMarzo said that recent promotions within in the police department make the organization top-heavy. “We need more men on the street.” He also noted that a consolidation study of the city’s fire department in the early ’90s recommended consolidation of the fire departments, but it was never implemented. DeMarzo also expressed sympathy for employees in public works. “(The department) is overburdened with criminal probes (for) malfeasance.” He says the media bears some of the blame for public perception of the department. “There’s a lack of management that was put in place.”

Schools?

He said he believes the Wildwood schools have made tremendous strides in recent years under improved leadership. He expects that improvements will continue. He praised teachers and administration for their enthusiasm and hard work. “If you don’t have a foundation, you can’t build a house.”

Tourism?

“It’s the fuel that drives our economy, but we are so tourism unfriendly…streets, signage, attitudes, mercantile licenses, fees…we are so unfriendly that it hurts economically.” DeMarzo praised the Morey organization. “If it wasn’t for their professionalism we wouldn’t be on the map.”

DeMarzo has been criticized for lawsuits he has filed against the city. Two are listed on his website. He declines comment on the pending litigation, except to say, “If there is no one listening to you, where do you go? You use the courts to resolve your issues civilly.”

DeMarzo supports a change in the form of government in Wildwood. “A commission form of government is dangerous. It relies on autonomy. The committee form of government allows you to have the benefit of input.”

In summary…

”I’m proud of the campaign that I’ve run. I am for…the betterment of the community, for fairness, for honesty and integrity.” Return to Story Index

Edward “Chip” Harshaw Sr. Ballot Position 7

He is 57 years old, born in Cleveland, but spent most of his childhood and adult life in Wildwood. He is married to Liberty Harshaw, a Wildwood High School teacher. The couple has three grown children. He teaches history and psychology at Cape May County Technical High School. He served as a summer police officer in Wildwood for nearly a decade. He served on the school board for about 16 years, he said, and as president of the board for five years. He ran for City Commission once, and he also ran for City Council before the city changed its form of government.

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected?

“The taxes are…high. I have a very strong belief that if you are going to complain about something, you better be willing to offer yourself up to solve the problem…The first thing I would do is go after the master plan. It has to be revised…to be modernized…to be brought into line with what’s happening right now. I’m not really happy about our government being asleep at the wheel during the building boom.”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“The issue that’s on everybody’s list is taxes.” Harshaw notes that the city’s ratable base climbed from $550 million to almost $2 billion in recent years. “…And we’re broke. We’re in debt…If somebody could say to taxpayers, ‘We’re spending the money and this is what we’re doing with it,’ and it’s for a good cause, I don’t think I’d be running in this election.”

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“We’re throwing lots of money after stuff that’s not important at this time. He notes that the new Doo Wop Museum is an example of this. “It’s nice, but we don’t have the money right now… If you had some sort of game plan in place this wouldn’t happen.” Harshaw said he believes there are too many city vehicles. “There’s a lot of waste.”

Development/High Rises?

“Let’s step back and look at the future. I don’t think that anybody did that with the master plan.”

Government services?

Harshaw believes that trash collection could be contracted out to cut costs on maintaining a vehicle fleet. “Our roads are horrendous. I’m not talking about Rio Grande Avenue (which is under county control). I am talking about Park Boulevard and other streets. For some of the contractors doing work in town there is no accountability.” Harshaw said if elected, he would implement a program where large fees are charged to developers and held in escrow until the roads that they dig up during construction are properly repaired.

Schools?

“I think we need that dreaded ‘C-word.’ We need to consolidate.”

Tourism?

“Our biggest assets are our beach and boardwalk. I was never an advocate for charging beach fees…but maybe we need to look at it. Harshaw said he has recently learned more about the fees and believes they could help defer the cost taxpayers incur for beach maintenance. “Our boardwalk is in terrible condition.” It needs to be addressed sooner rather than later, he said.

In summary...

“It’s time for a change. Actually, it’s past time for a change. We need a new government. We need a new form of government. With a council form of government, there are more checks and balances. With the commission form of government you almost need to be full time to know the workings of the department.” Return to Story Index

Sandra Richardson Ballot Position 8

She is 52 years old, born in Philadelphia. A lifetime Wildwood visitor - bought property here in 2000 and became a full-time resident. Holds a fine arts degree from Rowan University and a master’s degree from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey in instructional technology - dealing with the improvement of human learning and performance using technologies to enhance workflow. She is a certified teacher. She is married to Mark Richardson. The couple has four grown children. She is a former teacher, rental property manager, and a state-licensed builder. Volunteers with correctional facilities and convalescent centers in the area. She served on the school board for one year. Taxpayer advocate at meetings of city government.

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected?

“I love Wildwood. My family loves Wildwood. We feel we are a part of this town and we want to help make it better.” Richardson advocates for involving more committees in city government. “Key committees would be formed to address particular issues and reforms; instead of ‘tax and spend’ mentality we would implement a ‘pay as you go approach’… initiate a budget committee, a shared services committee; a beautification committee, etc. These committees would be made up of competent residents, business owners and developers/investors. They would work toward implementing programs and processes that would produce better outcomes.”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“Taxes – our taxes are too high.” Richardson said the two key issues in her campaign are affordability and smart growth - “affordability - so people can live here; own property here; and work here. And smart growth – better planning and better management of resources.”

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“We need to reduce the tax rate immediately.” Richardson said that if elected she would bring in a forensic accountant to analyze the city’s spending. “We need to see where the money is going, make sure our services are running efficiently to be able to see a snapshot of each day.” She says that she believes bringing a new face to government will make employees more accountable. “I am sure there are just a lot of things that need to be tightened up.”

Development/High Rises?

“I think with the high rises, we should have had a referendum. I think we put the cart before the horse. Before they rezoned our community they should have gone to the state. We are at a standstill now. We have to involve the community.” Richardson says she believes that development in town has been ineffectively planned, and that it fails to balance the needs of business owners, developers and residents. “If those three things are out of sink, you are not going to have a good sustainable community.”

Government services?

“I see so much waste in services.” She supports increasing shared services with neighboring municipalities. She also notes that George Burgess, the former recreation supervisor, was charged with stealing from the city under this administration’s watch. “We’ve got to put the right people in management positions. Employees have got to be trained to be more effective in their positions.”

Schools?

Richardson believes Wildwood schools are in need of vast improvement. “There are tons of schools with mixed populations. Their scores are off the charts…I think we are getting plenty of money. I think it’s a question of methods…money is not the solution.”

Tourism?

“I think we need to improve our reputation for tourists.” Richardson said she believes recent events in Wildwood have had a negative impact on the town’s image across the tri-state area – “the JCOW debacle, how investors are being treated…Our reputation has been marred drastically. That’s going to hinder us dramatically…Our fees are so high, it’s not an incentive for people to come here.” Richardson also notes that poor roads and vacant construction sights hurt Wildwood’s image. “We have a phenomenal place here…but when I mention Wildwood now, I don’t get a positive response. We have all these holes in our town now. It all goes back to planning.”

In summary...

This election is “about change - making life better here in Wildwood for residents, businesses and developers.” Return to Story Index

Anthony A. Totah Jr. Ballot Position 1

He was born Fort Worth, Texas, 1960. He’s been a Wildwood resident since 1987. Graduated with from University of Texas with a degree in biology with additional studies in Marine Biology. He is single with no family members living locally. “No problems with nepotism with me.” He has completed marine science and environmental education programs sponsored by Lehigh University, Clean Ocean Action, and the NJ Audubon Society; he is a freelance photographer, and owner/manager of a Wildwood rental property. He served two terms on the school board; Chairman of former Wildwood Environmental Commission; Active in local, county and state issues. A second-time candidate for commissioner.

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected?

“Wildwood has so much potential. It is such a great community. The only thing hurting it is the government. …Wildwood needs elected officials that listen to the need and opinions of the citizens. Citizens have the right to express their point of view and provide alternative ideas to the direction that the city is taking. Citizens should feel free to voice their opinions when it differs from city officials without the fear of insults, intimidation or reprisals.”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“There’s no accountability. JCOW – No one’s been held accountable…embezzlement (recreation center supervisor George Burgess), no accountability. And if no one knew what was going on there, that’s incompetence…There’s no checks and balances in this town. (Mayor) Ernie Troiano didn’t want anyone to argue with him. We’ve had everything railroaded down our throats.”

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“The city needs to try to get a hold of its spending and operate in a manner that doesn't waste the taxpayers’ money. It is obvious that neither the mayor nor either of the commissioners know how to control the city's spending problem. Instead it has been a "tax, spend and tax ’em again" administration. Not only have the taxes gone up but other fees have been added or increased. TDC tax was added was added to condos, apartments and rooming houses, mercantile fees have increased and last year water fees went up 34 percent. Not once was a tax or city fee reduced or removed.”

Development/High Rises?

“I believe in smart growth. You control the amount of development. You control the kind of development you want…planning for infrastructure and developing within that infrastructure. They went condo-crazy…too many, too quickly.” Totah says the approval of high rises should have been brought to the taxpayers for a vote. The high-rise buildings, approved by the city, are too big for too small lots.

Government services – streets, trash, police fire, etc?

“A problem we have is duplicate services. Everyone is complaining about the taxes. The number one way to reduce our taxes is to reduce redundancy (through consolidation). Right now no one wants to join with Wildwood because Wildwood is a mess. Until Wildwood gets its act in order, North Wildwood, West Wildwood and Wildwood Crest will never be willing to join with us to reduce taxes island-wide.”

Schools?

“I’ve been on school board for two years. One thing we did was get a new curriculum.” A new administration is in place, Totah says. “It’s definitely run much better. (The district) suffered from 15 years of neglect and mismanagement. It will take a couple years for that to kick in.” (Totah notes that the school will hold its first science fair this year as a result of his lobbying.)

Tourism?

“It’s our number one business. We need to provide more opportunities to improve on that business.” (Totah advocates for holding more tourism events in areas of town that don’t get much traffic – like Pacific Avenue.) “Nothing is done in the business district. One block of Pacific Avenue lost eight businesses last year.”

In summary…

”There’s been a failure to really look at problems in the town and address them properly… I have taken a lot of time and effort to study the issues and I am well prepared to work towards the goal of improving our community.” Return to Story Index

Ernest Troiano Ballot Position 3

The current mayor is 56 and a lifelong Wildwood resident. He graduated from Wildwood High School in 1969, and attended York College. He is married to Donna Troiano. The couple has three children and four grandchildren who live locally. Owns and operates E. Troiano and Sons - Concrete and Masonry contractors (est. 1917). Owns and operates two Papa John’s pizza franchises in Cape May County. Troiano has also served as a volunteer fireman for 35 years. He served on the school board for 11 years; on the zoning board for 15 years, member of the executive board of the Joint Construction Office of the Wildwoods (JCOW) from 1993 to the present, and has been the city commissioner of public works since 1999, supervising work at city parks, beaches, the boardwalk, municipal buildings and streets. He also oversees the city’s recreation center, planning board, sewer and water departments, trash collection and the new construction office (a service Wildwood has agreed to share with the other island towns).

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected?

“I was honored to grow up in Wildwood. It was a place based on family, community activities …and the well-being of others. I slowly watched that deteriorate until the ’90s, when you didn’t know who your neighbors were and had to lock the doors. There were no activities for kids in town.” Troiano said he decided to run for office because “If you are not part of the solution you are part of the problem. I was not happy with the direction of the community; the economics of Atlantic City casinos had a devastating effect. I jumped in and I got involved.”

Troiano says that his opponents in this year’s election offer criticism, but no solutions. He believes the town is on an upswing. “People don’t talk bad about Wildwood anymore.”

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“I think (what’s most important) is getting these (high rise) buildings in line to stabilize taxes. We are a city geared to a quarter of a million people.” As a result, the city must be prepared to provide services for a large influx of visitors in the summer, he said. “Do you know how many events we do that come out of my public works budget?” Troiano said that the city negotiates with event planners to get them to pick up a portion of the cost, “but if you end up asking for too much you end up not getting people.”

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“For every (high rise) building that goes up, taxes will go down about 10 percent. Each building is worth about $18 to $20 billion apiece. What’s the other team going to do? They are going to reduce spending by reducing manpower.” Troiano says the city has already reduced manpower, as much as it can without cutting crucial services. Troiano said that new construction in town is finally reaching the city’s tax roles, and it is possible that a no-increase budget could be introduced at today’s 3:30 commission meeting at city hall.

Development/High Rises?

Troiano believes what he calls “world-class hotels” are the key to a successful economic future here. “We’re on an island. In order to be able to develop, you can only go up.” He takes issues with critics, who say that the public was not given a chance to weigh in on his plan. “The planning and zoning board had their meetings. The DEP came down here and had their meeting.” The public was invited to speak at that time, he said. Troiano also takes issue with critics who say that the high rises were poorly planned. “The DEP already said you couldn’t build over 59 feet,” but he believes the issue is worth the fight. He also takes issue with those who say that his administration did nothing to slow the over-development of condominiums. “When I was trying to change the ordinance (to limit condos in certain zones), these guys (developers) got wind of it, and 97 applications came in before we could change (it.)…Wildwood was the only (island town) that was proactive (about restricting condo development). I was adamant about not all these condos going in.”

Government services?

“I think we need to (continue) consolidating services...In public works we do more work each year for less and less.”

Schools?

Troiano is a proud member of the Wildwood High School’s alumni group, the Warrior 50 Club, but he takes issue with his opponents, who served on school board, and decreed tax hikes, when last year’s school taxes increased to 5.7 cents.

Tourism?

He notes 135 hotels were torn down – about 4,000 hotel rooms were lost. The convention center is marketing to bring events and conventions to town. “Where are you going to put them? They are not going to stay in these condominiums. They want to stay in a world-class resort. (Tourism) is our bread and butter. We are looking to add rooms…to expand the season. Look how dead it was this winter…a ghost town.”

In summary...

“I think the election is about credibility. We are in the process of proving that our direction is the right direction. Wildwood has to evolve. It has to grow. It has to move forward. My Wildwood isn’t the same as my father’s, and my kids Wildwood is not the same as mine...Those who disagree with me on it – tell me what the plan is to make it better.” Return to Story Index

Ernesto M Salvatico Ballot Position 2

He is 79 years old, born in Montevideo, Uruguay. “I arrived in New York (in 1964) with nine cents in my pocket. I came looking for progress.” He registered for the selective service in 1965, and he became a citizen in 1970. Salvatico speaks Spanish, French and Italian, but he sometimes struggles to express his ideas in English. It is not an impediment to leading the city, he said. “You have to do something to solve the problem no matter what language you speak.” He is married to Laura Salvatico. The couple has three children and nine grandchildren. Salvatico has worked as a laborer and in sales. He worked as a shipping supervisor on the New York waterfront for 20 years, before he retired and moved to Wildwood, where he invested in real estate, he said. He currently owns many rental properties here, as well as acreage in upstate New York and Cumberland County. He and his wife manage the Clifton guest house on Glenwood Avenue and other vacation rentals. “I had vision,” he said. Salvatico has never held government office, but he says he has “been a part of the process” by attending public meetings and making proposals to local, state and federal officials. He has run for county freeholder twice and for commission at least two times, he said.

Why are you running for office? What will you do if elected?

Salvatico says he wants to share his success and his ideas with his community.

What is the most important issue facing Wildwood today?

“Wildwood has to grow up and become an international resort.” It is only then that it can expand its season and provide more job opportunities, he said. “The only way to expand is up. Air space is a future ratable…(and) we need more services for the tourists to compete with Atlantic City. We have to be more competitive.”

What is your position on:

Taxes?

“So many buildings have delayed taxes while they wait to be built. Not everyone pays the full taxes they are supposed to.” He says that he believes that the state and federal government have a stake in Wildwood’s success, and the city should secure more grant money before embarking on big projects.

Development/High Rises?

“We have to sacrifice what we enjoy sometimes - an ocean view – to obtain a future.” But Salvatico proposes that the city take another look at the master plan with an eye toward building smaller structures by the beach and larger structures further west. “That way everyone has an ocean view. We can share it, (while) we increase the volume and potential.” This plan could reduce taxes to zero in five to 10 years, he said. “People have to patient and give time for the process.”

Government services?

“This government is acephalous (lacking a head or a clearly defined head)…here a commissioner is a part-time job. We need a full-time commissioner to address so many issues…we need more supervision in each department…to have more control over taxes and fees.” The roads, Salvatico says are a “minor issue. We have to solve the big problems.” He suggests dredging the back bay to alleviate flooding. He also says that more thought needs to be put into an evacuation plan for the island that includes using high rise buildings as temporary shelter.

Schools?

“School budgets all over have a problem.” He recommends that more attention be paid to vocational training, and he suggests that the school day be split into morning and afternoon sessions to maximize resources.

Tourism?

Salvatico believes that the growing beach in Wildwood is a detriment to tourism. He has devised a plan to create a salt water pool on the beach that is replenished by the ocean. It will keep the beach from growing, and it will provide a safer place to swim, he said. He also advocates for a pool at the Convention Center to hold swimming events. In addition, he wants the city to work toward bringing more visitors to town with improved transportation. “Right now, we have three buses from New York a day. That’s 150 people. I could fit them in my house. We have to make a tourist express – round trip.”

In summary...

“The United States is an opportunity country. Anyone in the U.S. could be a millionaire with vision and ambition.” Salvatico says that that same vision and ambition can bring progress to Wildwood. Return to Story Index

Maureen L. Cawley can be e-mailed at maureen.cawley@catamaranmedia.com or you can comment on this story by calling 624-8900, ext. 250, or visiting www.shorenewstoday.com and clicking on the Speak Out link.

 
Wildwood’s 2nd homeowners: Will they be the swing voters?
By MAUREEN L. CAWLEY Correspondent

WILDWOOD – Any 6-year-old can tell you where their home is, but when it comes to determining an adult’s right to vote, it’s not so clear. The county Board of Elections determined last week that 38 Wildwood property owners do not meet the criteria to vote in the municipal election on May 8, and about 40 additional applications are still under consideration. In the hopes of securing the right to vote in this hotly contested race, a group of city taxpayers have hired attorney Brian McVan, of Glenside and Cherry Hill, to argue their case before Superior Court Judge Raymond Batten. This is not the first time McVan has appeared in court to defend the rights of would-be voters on the island. In 2001, when Philadelphia attorney and North Wildwood property owner Joseph H. O’Donnell Jr. challenged the seat of longtime Mayor Aldo Palombo, O’Donnell hired McVan to represent his supporters when they were challenged by local officials. On Election Day, McVan said he spent the day in Cape May County Court presenting arguments for many North Wildwood second homeowners who wanted to vote there. Many of the challenged registrants this year submitted voter forms by mail to the election board after attending a campaign meeting that candidate Sandra Richardson hosted in South Philadelphia last month, said county registrar, Joy Erb. The Philadelphia postmarks on the forms, and the requests for absentee ballots sent up a red flag for Erb, who was advised by the Attorney General to send ‘domicile’ forms to property owners to help determine their eligibility. Using that information, the election board made its decision to deny 38 Wildwood registrants. Some of them will be appearing before Judge Batten today at 11 a.m. Other cases may be heard over the next two weeks, but a number of registrants will likely be challenged when they show up at the polls on Election Day. If they are, they are entitled to an immediate hearing in county court to determine their eligibility, McVan said. McVan met with his clients for the first time over the past weekend. “They seemed genuinely interested in the community,” he said. But the judge will need to weigh more information than that to determine if they are entitled to vote here. “I have given them a list of the criteria that the court will look at,” McVan said, but there is no black and white formula for making the decision. A number of variables will be considered, including some of the information registrants included on the domicile form. The judge will want to know where individuals filed their income tax returns, where their cars are registered, and of course where they own property and pay taxes. But McVan is sure to point out that while property ownership is an important criterion, by itself, it does not entitle an individual to voting rights. “We have a system that allows one person, one vote,” he said. “We have to have some safeguard to ensure that each voter only votes once.” Some second homeowners are surprised to hear this, McVan said, but he explains it is how the system protects itself. “It’s for the integrity of the process,” he said, otherwise citizens could vote anywhere they own property. Carried out to an extreme example, it could allow a wealthy person to buy property in every state and vote 50 times in a federal election, he said. But the judge will also need to consider the rights of taxpayers to have a voice in their government. Many second homeowners have voiced frustration over what they see as “taxation without representation” in local communities. It is a powerful idea, McVann said, and the court will need to balance it against the idea of “one man one vote.” According to McVan, the system allows voters to vote in the place where they have the strongest ties. He said that he advised his clients that the judge would likely give considerable weight to their appeal if they wrote a formal letter to their previous election board withdrawing their right to vote at their former domicile. McVan said he did not know much about the political climate in Wildwood, but the prevalence of second homeowners in many New Jersey towns is bringing these issues to the forefront. He said that some of his new clients had expressed concerns about long-time business owners in the Wildwoods, who live elsewhere, but have voted in the city for years by using the addresses of their motels and businesses. McVan advised the second homeowners to formally notify the election board of their concerns, and the eligibility of these business owners would then need to be considered and voted on by the election board. “All voters should have the right to challenge.” he said. “I think it’s healthy for the system.” Return to Story Index

Maureen L. Cawley can be e-mailed at maureen.cawley@catamaranmedia.com or you can comment on this story by calling 624-8900, ext. 250, or visiting www.shorenewstoday.com and clicking on the Speak Out link.

 
LCM golfers get signature victory over St. Augustine
By BRIAN CUNNIFF Staff Writer

Before the season started, the Lower Cape May Regional golf team knew St. Augustine Prep was going to be one of the biggest obstacles in its quest to compete for the Cape-Atlantic National Conference title. On Friday, in the first of two meetings with the Hermits this spring, the Caper Tigers cleared that hurdle. Playing at Buena Vista Golf Club, the Prep’s home course, Lower Cape May had three players shoot under 40 in a 158-163 victory. The win kept the Caper Tigers unbeaten through seven matches, while St. Augustine (4-1) suffered its first loss. “We’ve never beaten St. Augustine, so it’s nice that we finally beat them,” said Jim Ridgway, who co-coaches the team with Jeff Wunder. “Buena Vista plays hard for every visiting team because it’s very tight; there are trees all over the course. A lot of high school teams struggle there because one bad hole can ruin a round. The kids all admitted afterwards they were a nervous wreck going up there, but they went out and performed. These guys are showing they’re capable of putting it together.” Lower Cape May’s Jordan Ransom took match-best honors with a 1-over-par 37. Ransom played a very consistent round, posting eight pars and a bogey. Jimmy Ridgway, the coach’s son, followed with a 2-over-par 38 with two birdies and Mike Morey shot 3-over-par 39. Bobby Magee’s 44 rounded out Lower Cape May’s scoring. Bob Nugent shot 38 to lead the Prep, but he was the only Hermit golfer to break 40. “Five strokes is a close match,” the elder Ridgway said. “They had some things go wrong for them and we had one big thing go right for us, which was Mike Morey. He really deserves kudos for that match. He gave us a third guy in the 30s and that’s what really beat them. We pretty much had it locked up when Morey turned in his 39. “He’s really been coming on for us. We thought at the beginning of the season we’d be real happy if he averaged 41 or so for us, but every few rounds he’s been able to put it together and go lower. He’s getting his confidence and he’s really becoming a solid third player for us.” Lower Cape May is off to its best start since 2004, when the Caper Tigers won the CAL American Conference title. The team has a key match Friday at Holy Spirit, which, like Lower Cape May, went into this week without a loss. “We can’t look past Holy Spirit,” Ridgway said. “We really need to stay focused and get through this week before we start patting ourselves on the back. But the good thing is, in the second part of the season (the National Conference’s better teams) all have to come to us.” CHIP SHOTS: Lower Cape May Regional High School assistant golf coach Anthony D’Aleo recorded a hole-in-one during one of the team’s practice rounds at Cape May National Golf Club earlier this spring. Using a pitching wedge, D’Aleo made the hole-in-one from 137 yards away on the 17th hole. Co-head coaches Jim Ridgway and Jeff Wunder witnessed the shot. … Lower ran its record to 8-0 with Monday’s win over Sacred Heart at Cape May National. Return to Story Index

 

Improving Middle Township wins tournament title
By BRIAN CUNNIFF Staff Writer

CAPE MAY – The Middle Township High School boys tennis team doesn’t have much of a winning tradition. Over the past few seasons, however, the Panthers have been doing their best to change that. Middle, which qualified for the state tournament in 2005 and 2006, took another step forward Saturday by winning the team championship and three of the five position titles at the annual Cape May Tennis Club High School Round Robin Tournament. In addition to Middle, the tournament annually includes Lower Cape May, Wildwood and Wildwood Catholic. For the 2007 tournament, Jenkintown (Pa.) High School also traveled to the area and participated. The tournament format has players competing against one another for one set. Each player (or players at the doubles slots) plays all of the other players at their positions, with the winner determined by total number of games won. “Winning this is a huge step for our program,” said second-year Middle coach Matt Gilbert. “We have pretty much all young guys out there right now. It’s a huge step and a big accomplishment. This is one of the biggest things we’ve won in a long time.” Joe Morse, one of just two seniors among Middle’s top seven, won every one of his sets to win the prestigious first singles titles. “Morse really played exceptional,” Gilbert said. “No one got more than two or three games against him.” Middle, which totaled 110 points (games won) to beat second-place Lower Cape May by 13 points, got its other two position victories at both doubles slots. Sophomores Eddie Obropta and Dylan Hughes went unbeaten at first doubles and senior Joe DiCicco and sophomore Colin Dooley were unbeaten at second doubles. Lower Cape May senior Greg Palmer won the second singles title. Wildwood Catholic senior Mike Tompkins earned the third singles. Tompkins and Middle Township freshman Joel Novick tied for total number of games won, but Tompkins beat Novick head to head to win first place by tiebreaker. Gilbert is optimistic his club can continue to improve, especially since five of the top seven are underclassmen. “We want to make the state playoffs for the third year in a row,” said Gilbert. “We’re making a lot of progress as a program. The hard work is playing off for these guys. They’re really putting in the time and effort to get better.” Return to Story Index

 

Close to perfect, Hopkin settles for no-hitter and strikeout record
By BRIAN CUNNIFF Staff Writer

John Hopkin pitched a no-hitter with 19 strikeouts last Thursday afternoon, and still got teased the next day in school. That’s because Hopkin, a junior left-handed pitcher for the Middle Township High School baseball team, came within one bad throw – his own bad throw – of tossing a perfect game in the Panthers’ 4-0 victory over Bridgeton. After retiring the first 20 batters in a row and needing just one more out to complete the extremely rare feat, Hopkin got the 21st batter to hit a ground ball right back to him. Hopkin fielded the ball cleanly, but his throw was high and wide and pulled first baseman Sean Schellinger off the bag, allowing the Bridgeton batter to reach base. “I probably slept about two hours last night because I was thinking about that the whole time,” said Hopkin, who otherwise took his lost perfect game with a sense of humor. “Every single class I had (Friday), guys were busting on me. “I got the kid to ground out, but …” All kidding and teasing aside, however, Hopkin’s performance was nothing short of brilliant. His 19 strikeouts broke the school record of 18 set by Kenny Johnson all the way back in 1981. Ironically, had he retired the hitter on the comeback grounder with two outs in the seventh inning, Hopkin would have only tied the school single-game strikeout record. He needed just three pitches to retire the final batter for the record-breaking strikeout. “He didn’t have a three-ball count until the kid who got on,” said Middle coach Chuck Dougherty. “At one time, he had thrown 56 strikes and only 19 balls. A lot of guys, he was striking them out one, two, three. A lot of the balls he threw could have been strikes, that’s how close his pitches were. He was really on.” Dougherty’s long-time assistant, pitching coach Steve Ragan, also came away impressed. “Even his curve ball, it was coming right off the table for strikes,” Ragan said. “He was very calm and relaxed from the first pitch to the last.” Hopkin hopes the no-hitter represents a breakthrough outing. “It should help me lot,” he said. “I have a lot more confidence.” Return to Story Index

 

McKenna, Seabrook to make college choices official

Wildwood Catholic High School athletes Tiffany McKenna and Shane Seabrook will make their college choices official at a ceremony at the school late this morning (Wednesday). McKenna, who helped lead the Crusader girls cross country team to the state Non-Public B championship in the fall and is already off to an outstanding start to the spring track season, will run at Division I Monmouth University next year. Seabrook, a midfielder for the Crusader boys soccer team that won the South Jersey Non-Public B championship, will play soccer at Division II Millersville University in the fall. McKenna and Seabrook are expected to sign their National Letters of Intent at the school at 11:30 a.m. Return to Story Index

 

Crusader quartet wins relay race at Woodbury
By BRIAN CUNNIFF Staff Writer

Wildwood Catholic High School again proved it has one of the best collections of distance runners in South Jersey over the weekend. The Crusaders, who won the state Non-Public B title in cross country in the fall, have now shifted their efforts to the track this spring and came away with an impressive victory at the Woodbury Relays. Wildwood Catholic’s Tara Wuko, Destinee Caffarella, Kellianne Gawarzewski and Tiffany McKenna combined to finish in first place among Group I/Division B teams in the distance medley relay by finishing the race in 13 minutes, 13 seconds. The time was a meet record in Group I/Division B. “It was a good day for them,” said Wildwood Catholic coach Michael Scythes. “It’s the first time anybody from Wildwood Catholic has done that at Woodbury.” Wuko ran the 1,200 meters, Caffarella was the 400-meter runner, Gawarzewski handled the 800 and McKenna ran the 1,600. “Based on what the girls did in cross country, we thought they had a very good chance to do well,” Scythes said. “Woodbury’s an open race do you never know who might come in, but we were pretty confident.” Return to Story Index

 

Building on what success?

To the Editor: Your campaign slogan, Building on Success, should really read, Building on Taxes and Bonding. Both have been up every year since you have been in office. Building on Nothing. Just look at all the empty lots. Building on a depressed-looking Pacific Avenue. Some buildings and windows have been boarded up for the entire eight years you have been in office. Building on the pot hole streets for the past eight years. Building on hiring more and more friends. Twenty-six blocks and about 250 year-round employees. Building on supplying cars, SUVs and trucks for employees to take home and use. Who pays for the gas? Used up the entire gas budget last year by August. Building on a rec center that the residents and taxpayers neither want nor can afford. Probably 10 to 12 more year-round employees to staff it. Building on a proposal to build about 120 low-income housing units. Remember Mayor Ernie is a tax and spend mayor. We can’t afford him anymore. Wildwood needs a change. New faces, new ideas and less spending. Vote May 8. Return to Story Index

Al Brannen Wildwood

 

Left-handed compliment

To the Editor: After reading Mr. Deegan's letter in your April 11 issue, which was supposedly pro-mayor, I'm wondering. I'm not for or against Mayor Troiano. I can't vote. I'm an outsider looking in. The first part of the letter was glowing praise. Then Mr. Deegan goes on to say that, four years ago, the mayor told him he wouldn't recognize the town in a few years if he were elected. Ernie Troiano was elected. His statement about the town being unrecognizable came true. Many motels and businesses are missing. Taxes are higher. JCOW caused upheaval and strife. Public works is under investigation. Condos sit empty. Proposed high rises haven't risen. Pacific Avenue is about the only thing that remains the same. The town is unrecognizable. Then, Mr. Deegan, in the rest of his letter, goes on to agree with some of the above, and adds to it. He says motel rooms are at a critical shortage. This is a tourist town with no place to stay. He asks, "How can you run a resort with no place to stay? What rooms that are left are overpriced, filthy, and run by unpleasant people." Mr. Deegan hears people complaining. He says they are now going to Cape May, Sea Isle, etc. Wildwood is losing business, according to Mr. Deegan. Well, Mr. Deegan, the mayor's been in for four years and is responsible for the situation, isn't he? If high taxes, spending money, losing business, no motel rooms, and tourists deserting are positive, then the mayor deserves to be re-elected as you say. Return to Story Index

Mike Smalley West Mifflin, Pa.

 

Brannen’s bashing is unfair

To the Editor: The negativity being promoted toward the mayor by a very small group in Wildwood is hateful and desperate. This is not being done at the behest of improving Wildwood. One person who can be counted on for a consistent negative barrage is Mr. Brannen. His complaints, as usual, are without solutions, and often wrong and misleading. His comments reflect a poorly orchestrated attempt which impacts our community unfairly. His efforts are designed to push forth candidates not qualified to run a city. Being a school board member does not alone qualify anyone. Mr. Brennan's stance against the recreation/community center that is currently being constructed falls at the plight of children and senior citizens. The center provides productivity for everyone. The old center was outdated and incapable of serving this community. He disagreed with the new convention center, which has been a greater draw for our community; against the building of new condominiums that would erase the sore aesthetics that filled this town. Should we refrain from growth and accept the failure of a city to grow? I oppose remaining stagnate and falling into further disrepair. We've attracted more new people due to our growth. I find Mr. Brannen's views a poor influence toward the future of Wildwood. His opposition to the high rise resort buildings also shows poor vision for future gains. While high rise resorts bring fear of change, it brings in a wealth of taxes, which will greatly lower taxation for our citizens. We need modern resorts that can meet the demand and amenities so many expect from a unique resort. We are coming into a new era that will reward this city and its citizens. And if that city is not spending money to increase its capability to be a productive and vibrant attraction, then we might as well seal entry to this city and lock our doors. Mr. Brannen and his group produce nothing but venomous attacks that undermine the positives Wildwood has taken to move into the 21st century. His negative diatribe, and that of his group, is no longer welcome in a city that is moving forward. There have been hard fights to get grants to affect positive changes in Wildwood. Yet never is appeasement found. The only avenue sought by Mr. Brannen and his tainted followers is bred through ignorance. The attacks on those who accentuate positive change must end. Thanks to Ernie's vision of the future, wonderfully insightful and selfless people such as the Byrne family, positive change will occur. I support and admire Ernie for his diligence in choosing a path that enables Wildwood its former glory. Ernie loves this town. His roots, as well as our entire family are deeply imbedded here. While he is attacked on taxes, it is the constant efforts of the state's reassessments that lay to blame. Five times have Wildwoods properties been unfairly assessed. This is all while the city's tax ratable has actually been going up. If blame is to go around, let it fall on the state. Did anyone know that upon Ernie's inception into political office, he inherited a $6 million deficit? In closing, I would like to note that Ernie has been unfairly accused with the condition of the main artery (Rio Grande Ave.) coming into Wildwood. This is the county, not Ernie. He's worked hard with the county to finally get the project moving. Return to Story Index

James Troiano Wildwood (Editor’s note: The letter writer is the mayor’s brother.)

 

Time for a change in Wildwood

To the Editor: I just read where this present administration is running on one ticket under the logo “Building on Success.” Are they kidding? The city of Wildwood has been on a downward spiral since this administration took over with their outrageous spending and promises of lowering taxes with all the new ratables and then raising them year after year. In my heart, I can’t trust Mayor Troiano’s promises anymore. Relatives of mine still live in Wildwood and some are being forced to sell because of high taxes make it no longer affordable. Why would this administration do this to the taxpayers? I visit Wildwood often but recent years I have been appalled at the condition of the town. The streets are dirty, the Boardwalk is in deplorable condition and dangerous. It is no longer the pleasant experience of walking along the boards, playing games, eating your favorite things and frequenting your favorite bars and restaurants. The stores on the Boardwalk are awful and all seem to sell cheap T-shirts some with disgusting messages printed on them for young children to see. I thought the Boardwalk was supposed to be a place for whole family could enjoy. I hope everyone else is keeping abreast of the missteps of this present administration as I am and vote these people out of office. Someone gave me three websites of candidates whose positions they felt were interesting. I must say I was impressed. The websites are: www.votedemarzo.com, www.voteTotah.com and www.RichardsonforWildwood.com. Return to Story Index

Maureen Sagarna Jenkinson, Pa.

 


 

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